<   Back to Material Exchange

Industry News - Sustainability & Innovations

33 Sustainability efforts of the fashion industry in April and May 2020

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

Queen of Raw Among the First to Get Funding From MIT Solve

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

Recycling and textiles in the Valley: What you need to know

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

Coronavirus Will Force Fashion To A Sustainable Future

Posted by Chad Ellis • No comments

Mindful Consumption / Fashion Seasons

Posted by Angela VT • No comments

The world is paying a high price for cheap clothes

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

As States Lift Business Closure Orders, How Shoe Stores Plan to Reopen Safely

Posted by Chad Ellis • No comments

The reality behind fashion’s sustainability certifications and coalitions

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

Swedish Fashion Council

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

How fashion can avoid blowing up the Paris Agreement

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

Material Testing Report: Proposal for Amending EU Regulation 10/2011; Materials and Articles Intended to Come into Contact with Food

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

Sustainability: A Lever for Post-Coronavirus Relaunch

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

COMMUNITY HELP: INDUSTRY NEWS – SUSTAINABILITY & INNOVATIONS

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

“It’s Collapsing Violently”: Coronavirus Is Creating a Fast Fashion Nightmare

Posted by Luke Simms • No comments

×

How fashion can avoid blowing up the Paris Agreement

Posted by Luke Simms

on 20 April 2020

Photo by Chris LeBoutillier from Pexels

This year, a clear picture will emerge as to how committed fashion is to sustainability.

Brands have signed en masse to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, buying carbon offsets and developing new sustainable materials — all profound shifts for an industry entrenched in its ways. The jury is still out as to whether this means genuine transformation, but it won’t be for long. “[Fashion is] at a crossroads where one direction leads to a rapid scale-up of implementation that’ll turn it into a real climate leader,” says Liz McDowell, director at environmental organisation Standearth. “The other direction leads to more commitments, but without real implementation…ultimately would be large-scale greenwash.”

An informal survey of experts suggests that the industry has done a masterful job of dabbling in innovation and running pilot projects, but hasn’t yet brought any of it to the scale that’s needed. Today, the fashion industry produces about 8 per cent of the maximum carbon emissions possible if the rise in global temperatures is to be limited to two degrees Celsius. On its current path, the industry could produce more than 26 per cent of those emissions by 2050, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. And for all the commitments made in 2019, progress may have slowed.

To read the full article from Vogue Business: Click Here

Translate »